Think Tanks

Solving the Parent Trap

Solving the Parent Trap

Those with young and school-aged children are caught in an anxiety-inducing parent trap. Parents are having sleepless nights fearing for their jobs while also being worried about the health and well-being of their kids. But we argue that it shouldn’t be this way. Solving the Parent Trap is a policy series on transforming childcare and education featuring ideas from Janet Davis, Nigel Barriffe, Marit Stiles, Beyhan Fahardi and Maria Dobrinskaya and edited by Katrina Miller and Brittany Andrew-Amofah.

Broadbent Inst: Survey finds Canadians want to see bold new ideas in next week’s throne speech

Broadbent Inst: Survey finds Canadians want to see bold new ideas in next week’s throne speech

New information from a survey commissioned by the Broadbent Institute shows that a majority of Canadians (54 per cent) want to see the federal government announce bold new ideas for how to fundamentally improve people’s lives and deal with climate change in next week’s throne speech. The desire for major changes is consistent across Canada and across the political spectrum. This is likely informed by the fact that only 19 per cent of Canadians think the worst of the pandemic is behind us and 65 per cent believe the pandemic has highlighted problems with how the economy and social programs are run that require major changes.

CCPA: Resetting Normal Report: Women, Decent Work and Canada's Fractured Care Economy

CCPA: Resetting Normal Report: Women, Decent Work and Canada's Fractured Care Economy

Economic losses due to COVID-19 have fallen heavily on women, and most dramatically on women living on low incomes who experience intersecting inequalities based on race, class, disability, education, migration, and immigration status. The pandemic crisis has revealed the fragility of response systems and the urgent need for structural rethinking and systemic change.

CCPA: Households are on the flipside of the federal deficit

CCPA: Households are on the flipside of the federal deficit

According to analysis from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA), of the other sectors of the economy, 65% of the deficit was spent on households, 12% on supporting corporations with 5% going to the provinces. That 75% of the deficit for households breaks down into 27% on jobless benefits, 24% on payroll supports and 7% on lower income taxes (because incomes fell).