Opinions & Analysis

Republicans Don’t Want the “Wrong Kind of People” to Vote

Republicans Don’t Want the “Wrong Kind of People” to Vote

On November 22, 2000, a phalanx of chino-clad Republican operatives descended on Florida’s Miami-Dade County polling headquarters, where local officials were scrambling to complete a manual recount of ballots cast in the presidential contest between George W. Bush and Al Gore. Swarming the lobby of the government high rise, the GOP protesters chanted and banged on the glass wall as local officials inside attempted to review ballots. Faced with an increasingly dangerous situation, the county canvassing board abandoned its recount, which had seemed poised to deliver a substantial number of votes for Gore.

David Frum Fights the Right

David Frum Fights the Right

On the evening of November 2, 2018, a Munk Debate took place at Toronto’s Roy Thomson Hall arguing the proposition that the future of Western politics is populist, not liberal. As the beginning drew near, protests erupted in front of the venue because the organizers had chosen Steve Bannon—architect of the Trump campaign, former leader of the alt-right Breitbart empire, Svengali to apprenticing authoritarians, and the world’s foremost proponent of the slept-in blazer—to argue on behalf of populism. But commentators were also aghast at the person tasked with defending the values of classical liberalism: David Frum. Yes, that David Frum: the Axis of Evil neocon who served in the George W. Bush White House, boisterously supported the Iraq War, and authored a handful of books advocating hardline conservative policies.

Why we need to resurrect the ‘syndicalism’ of the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike

Why we need to resurrect the ‘syndicalism’ of the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike

Due to the numerous commemorative events surrounding its centenary, many are now familiar with the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike, the longest and most complete general strike in the history of the continent.

At commemorative events held in 2019, the predominant narrative of the strike was that its importance lies in the success that labour-affiliated political parties enjoyed in the decades following the strike. Workers in 1919 may have bristled at this interpretation.

Whether it’s for Trump or Biden, Americans who trust others are more likely to vote

Whether it’s for Trump or Biden, Americans who trust others are more likely to vote

Forecasting election results is hard. Predicting who will turn out to vote next week in the United States is not.

The rich are more likely to vote than the poor. The better educated are more likely to vote than the less educated. White people are more likely to vote than racialized Americans.

As a scholar who has studied trust and how it matters for years, I can say that generalized trust — an expectation of good will and benign intent of others — is also a powerful predictor of voter turnout.

What a Trump win or loss will mean for feminism

What a Trump win or loss will mean for feminism

In the United States, polls are pointing to a Joe Biden, Kamala Harris win on Tuesday. Media pundits are unusually cautious about polls and projections about the election outcome, and women want so badly to see the end of the “pussy-grabber-in-chief” that they almost dare not give voice to their dire wish.

If Donald Trump loses the election, he will blame everyone but himself.

‘Herd Immunity’ Is an Inviting Idea but Terrible Policy

‘Herd Immunity’ Is an Inviting Idea but Terrible Policy

Best estimates show that COVID-19 has infected about 10 per cent of the global population to date and killed more than one million people. Records on excess mortalities in various nations suggest the true toll of the pandemic is likely half again greater than official tallies. The virus is clearly on a determined roll. And the vast majority of us are still being hunted.

Is it too late to change the world?

Is it too late to change the world?

In a March morning in 2019, I was preparing to attend the Montreal leg of Greta Thunberg’s first global march for the climate. I had just come from the dentist, and despite my frozen bottom lip — and the drool I suspected was dribbling down my chin — I felt the same electric sense of purpose and community that I have always felt in the lead-up to a demonstration.

Then I heard about the terrorist attack in New Zealand that targeted Muslims at Friday prayer, killing 51 and injuring 49. Two of the bleakest crises collided for me then — a planet careening towards climate catastrophe and an ever-growing sea of hate, Islamophobia, and intolerance.

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