Opinions & Analysis

Ottawa’s quixotic jolt to our electric-battery industry is riskier than it’s letting on

Ottawa’s quixotic jolt to our electric-battery industry is riskier than it’s letting on

Could it be that decisions on where to locate complex manufacturing processes are based on more than just “where the stuff is in the ground”?

It turns out you can ship the stuff from one place to another. So you can make batteries in places that have no large mineral deposits, such as Japan or South Korea, if it makes sense on other grounds.

Should Canadian firms get into the same business? Should Canadian producers of nickel and copper, which now ship most of their output abroad, divert these shipments to Canadian battery manufacturers? Should the makers of products that use these batteries, such as electric vehicles, also locate their factories in Canada?

Toronto is howling for help. And Doug Ford is saying, we don’t believe you, wait

Toronto is howling for help. And Doug Ford is saying, we don’t believe you, wait

As the coronavirus rages in Toronto there are two things to consider, if you have time. One is what needs to be done. COVID-19 cases are soaring, and with a still-massive testing backlog, the full picture is almost certainly worse. Toronto Public Health is pulling back on contact tracing because between the backlog and the volume, the rivers are too high.
Ford government an example of why long-term care shouldn't be in the hands of the provinces

Ford government an example of why long-term care shouldn't be in the hands of the provinces

On July 30, 2020, the Ontario government quietly released a study on staffing in long-term care. The government-initiated report recognizes "the critical importance of staffing in long-term care homes" and says the government must "urgently address the staffing crisis in long-term care, make long-term care homes a better place to live and work, implement staffing approaches that reflect and respond to the complexity of the sector and diverse resident needs."