Analysis

The tensions that will drive digital-first communications in 2021

The tensions that will drive digital-first communications in 2021

Looking at 2021, a theme has emerged. Rather than holistic trends driving us. We see tension points. Opposing views. Paradoxes. Conflicts. Opportunities.

Need proof? Look down south where within the first week, the United States’ political tension erupted in armed conflict.

These tensions are not just political. Rather, the political tensions are the result of others: generational, economic and societal.

As communicators, our job is to understand the context and provide clarity. Our jobs are made harder when there is no clarity, but shades of grey. As we look ahead to 2021, embracing and recognizing these tension points will be key. We need to recognize there isn’t one dominant world view or one way of communicating.

The Waiting is the Hardest Part

The Waiting is the Hardest Part

The COVID-19 pandemic was officially declared 10 months ago, in March 2020. For many, this seems like a lifetime ago. The virus has taken a substantial toll, not only in deaths, but also in the costs people around the world have incurred since its emergence. Yet with vaccine development and approvals happening at breathtaking speed, there is a light at the end of the tunnel.

Canadians have made great efforts in response to COVID-19, with the majority engaging in various social distancing measures. But people are tired. For most Canadians, whatever hope comes from a vaccine will soon come up against the fatigue of waiting to receive a dose.

If O’Toole Wants to Save His Party from Extremists

If O’Toole Wants to Save His Party from Extremists

It seems to have taken a mob of insurrectionists breaching the United States Capitol Buildings for Canadian Conservative leader Erin O’Toole to declare that his party is “no place for the far right,” after years in which it played to that crowd. But, if O’Toole really wants to ensure the Tories aren’t a home for such extremism, he also needs to speak out against the misinformation and disinformation that have become articles of faith for too many Conservative voters.

What To Expect When You're Expecting An Election Result

What To Expect When You're Expecting An Election Result

Election day in B.C. is upon us. Navigating election day, and beyond, was tricky before the pandemic, and these unprecedented times add complexity to the days and weeks ahead. As B.C. prepares for the big day, here is what to expect when you’re expecting an election result.

Early predictions that John Horgan and the BC NDP will form government have remained largely unchanged since writ drop. Premier Horgan remains popular and polling numbers have been steady, though in the last week we have seen the race tighten, as political races tend to do.

Wells: Justin Trudeau, wondering what he has to lose

Wells: Justin Trudeau, wondering what he has to lose

“Mr. Speaker, with what the leader of the opposition said this morning, with the motion he put forward in his own name, and even with the question he is just asking, he is demonstrating clearly that he has lost confidence in the government’s ability to manage this pandemic.” Now, he said, all the opposition had left to do was to express its contempt in a vote, and then off we’d go to an election.

On its face, this was an epically thin-skinned response. “You’re covering up” is, after all, as common a greeting in Ottawa as “Good morning,” and normally people don’t hurl themselves off the nearest cliff in response.

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