Quebec anti-racism task force calls for end to police demands for ID without cause

In response to task force recommendation, Quebec's Junior Minister of Health says it should be enshrined into law that police cannot stop people on the street or in a car without a clear motive.

The Canadian Press

MONTREAL — An anti-racism task force created by the Quebec premier last June is recommending that police across the province stop randomly stopping people.

Junior health minister Lionel Carmant told reporters today it should be enshrined into law that police cannot stop people on the street or in a car without a clear motive.

Carmant says the task force is also recommending police forces create mixed patrol units that include social workers who he says will help de-escalate tensions during police interventions.

The minister says he believes all his task force's recommendations will be taken up by the Quebec government in the next two years.

Quebec Premier Francois Legault created the task force in June, promising that his government would take more concrete action to fight racism than any previous provincial government.

The task force issued a series of other recommendations including ensuring more minority representation in Quebec's civil service and state-run corporations, as well as creating the position of minister responsible for fighting racism.

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